Betta Diseases – Curing Your Betta Fish With a Salt Bath

March 11, 2013

Since many betta diseases occur due to improper tank conditions, most of these afflictions can be treated the same way. A salt bath may be the last thing you think could benefit your freshwater betta fish, but is actually a very effective, age-old cure that is one of the first steps you need to take to nurse your betta back to health. Of course, the best case is to have a proper betta tank set-up to begin with, but more on that later.

How can salt help a freshwater fish, you ask? The bacteria and protozoa that attack your fish when its immune system is deficient are very low single cell forms of life. Common betta diseases are then transmitted to your fish by these simple life forms.

Betta Fish With Dropsy

Betta Fish With Dropsy

They have almost no form of defense system, so even a gradual change in the level of salt in your aquarium will cause instant death to these primitive beings. They simply can not adapt quickly enough to the resultant change in their environment.

Why doesn’t it harm my betta, you ask? Fish are more complex beings, and have internal organs such as kidneys to help them deal with external environmental changes. They are much hardier than microscopic bacteria. Therefore a very minute change in the salt levels of their tanks causes them almost no discernible level of discomfort.

To learn what ratio of salt to fresh water to use, consult a comprehensive guide (the same one I use every day is available at the end of this column, with some freebies I finagled for you) for your particular fish. Usually, a ratio of one tablespoon per five gallons of aquarium water is fine for ongoing conditions, but this level needs to be significantly increased when treating betta diseases in a recovery tank or bucket.

Using salt to treat your sick betta is just one step to take to bring your fish back to full health. Once healthy, ongoing tank maintenance needs to be followed, and other tips and tricks can be used to ensure your betta lives as long and healthy a life as possible. Most bettas live about six months on average, but when proper preparation and care are employed, you can have a vibrant, lively betta for three to five years.

Want to learn all about betta disease prevention and treatment, and discover how to triple your betta’s lifespan? Then get the book pet store owners don’t want you to read. An acclaimed 25 year betta expert (and my good friend) reveals incredible tips to give your betta the healthiest, happiest, longest life. Available for immediate download at THIS LINK.
Beth C.

P.S.
I have arranged for $20 in free bonuses for you, and a discounted price! But this is a limited time offer. Wanna see what you’ll get? GO HERE for details.

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Betta Diseases – Acid Fast Betta Disease

April 29, 2010

Betta Diseases – Acid Fast
By Elizabeth Christopher

Betta diseases are generally not a hazard to humans. One rare case is the acid-fast disease, or mycobacteria, which causes tuberculosis and leprosy in fish. These bacteria can also produce these diseases in humans, although treatment for humans is much more effective. They have a waxy wall around them which makes them almost impervious to treatment. Another line of defense against chemicals is the fact that they have very slow growth, which means that it takes an extended amount of time for treatment to have any effect.

Mycobacterial infections are more common among bettas of old age, whose immune system has weakened. Fish known to be old compared to their relatives, fish who are past their prime and fish raised in high temperatures are some of the most common prey for acid-fast disease. It can be diagnosed by red, bloody lesions anywhere on the body. They do not expand, nor do they disappear. They are impervious to antibiotics, and are the most resilient of all betta diseases. Once contracted, the afflicted betta should be discarded or placed in a quarantine tank until death. There are no cost-effective treatments.

To make a definitive statement that it is indeed acid-fast disease and not a similar looking symptom, a skin smear must be taken. The smear is then treated with an acid-fast staining technique laboratories use to identify this particular mycobacterial family, thus the name. The presence of red stained rods in the smear is the indication that indeed acid-fast bacteria have infected the host fish.

Since this can be contracted by humans, proper care and handling of your betta should always be employed. Washing your hands vigorously before and after any aquarium maintenance with an anti-bacterial soap is usually enough to ensure protection against contamination, but gloves can be worn to take your safety to another level.

As is true in almost all betta diseases, poor tank maintenance can help promote mycobacterial growth. Proper water temperature, salt-to-water ratio and many other factors decide how happy and healthy your betta will be, and how long she will live. In some cases betas have been known to live up to two times longer than their relatives who went to lesser quality tanks.

“Want to know the Betta Facts for successful betta set-up and care? I have enjoyed raising healthy, happy bettas for over 20 years. Head to this special web site for some incredible betta care tips (and a limited time offer). See you there!”

Elizabeth Christopher

P.S.
If you enjoyed the info, don’t forget to share with your friends through the social buttons below! Let’s save as many Betta Fish as we can, and give them the best lives possible.


Betta Diseases – Proper Preparation Prevents Poor Recuperation

April 19, 2010

Betta Diseases – Proper Preparation Prevents Poor Recuperation
By Elizabeth Christopher

It is said that an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure. While this is definitely the case with bettas, once they become sick, their condition can deteriorate quickly. That is why you want to be ready in advance with all the tools you will need if your fish contracts any of the many betta diseases.

You might think that you can always head out to the local pet store if and when you notice your fish are unhealthy. There are two major problems with this strategy. First, by the time symptoms appear on your fish, the betta diseases causing those symptoms have already been growing, and becoming stronger, and your fish weaker. This means a longer recovery time, and a smaller window for treatment. Second, the store may be out of whatever meds or tools you need. That could spell disaster for your betta.

The first thing you will want to purchase for your betta first aid kit is sea salt, or aquarium salt. You do not need much, and it is very inexpensive. When treating bettas in a recovery tank or bucket, generally a couple tablespoons per gallon of water is needed. You will also find that placement of a tablespoon per gallon of tank water does wonders for your fish during tank water changes.

Buy a one gallon bowl or jar for holding and treating fish. When you remove sick bettas to this tank, use the water they were already in and acclimated to, as to lessen the shock of moving. Keep some antibacterial soap on hand for yourself, as you definitely do not want to spread betta diseases to your healthy fish after handling sick ones.

Buy rubber gloves and a scrub brush that you use specifically for tank cleaning and water changes and nothing else. I was at a friend’s house once, and suggested that his tank was behind time for a cleaning. He promptly went to his kitchen and returned with a scrub brush. Yikes! No matter how hard you clean, you may transfer chemicals to you betta’s tank. Only use tools that are specifically for your betta tank.

Betta diseases are all different, but a few chemicals treat many of them. Tetracychlin is a good all around treatment for many betta bacteria, and can be found at most pet stores. The more difficult betta diseases need to be treated on an individual basis, but some of the better meds for these are kanamycin and ampicillin. As always, consult manufacturer’s labels for proper application.

Hi guys,
Elizabeth here.
I just wanted to say thank you for reading, and let you in on a special offer that a friend of mine has made available to the readers of my blog.

Adam Short has been raising Betta Fish for over 25 years, and has compiled all his extensive knowledge into the most comprehensive, no “B. S.” (baloney sandwich) betta care guide I have found. I have personally been raising bettas for 20 years, and was amazed at the amount of information in this e-Book that I would never have known, like how to get bettas to live up to 5 years!

For a limited time, if you use this special link …
http://www.GodzillaFish.info
you will receive this amazing Betta Care Guide
at a special price, and
4 FREE bonuses.

Here’s what you get –

1 – Betta Care Guide – regular price $19.77
Already over 970 happy customers. Covers tank prep, purchasing supplies, choosing bettas, maintenance, upkeep and treating disease. Most exhaustive betta care guide I have found. (I personally value this guide at over $100, it is that good.)

2 – Medicine Checklist – regular price $4.95
A list of products to keep in your Betta medicine chest. A must have.

3 – Online Shopping Checklist – regular price $4.95
A list of the best places to shop online for Betta supplies.

4 – Aquarium Checklist – regular price $4.95
A complete list of all of the items you need to start and run your Betta aquarium the right way.

5 – Specific Recommendations and Reviews – regular price $4.95

This is a $39.57 value … and you can get it today for only $14.77.
That’s about the cost of two betta fish (or one nice one!).

Adam is allowing this special offer to go to only the
NEXT 50 36 betta lovers who use this special link … http://www.GodzillaFish.info

This offer will not last long, so click the link and download now.

This is the same course I refer to every day, and I know it can help enrich your life and the lives of your beautiful bettas.

Elizabeth

P.S.
When you get the course, let me know
what you think and I will post
your input here!

ElizabethChristopher@BettaFacts.info

aquarium salt, betta, betta fish, Tetracychlin, kanamycin, ampicillin, betta diseases, sea salt


Plakat Betta – The Hearty Short Finned Betta Fighter

April 18, 2010

Plakat Betta – The Hearty Short Finned Betta Fighter
By Elizabeth Christopher Elizabeth Christopher

The term “pla kat” actually means “fighting fish” in Thailand. The term was shortened to plakat betta somewhere many moons ago, and is used to refer to any short-finned mouth brooding bettas. Plakat betta are closer in genetics to nature’s betta fighter, and their shorter fins and betta tail allow them much better movement in the water than their more dramatic long-finned cousins.

Any time you make a copy of a copy, you get a watered down version of the original. After literally hundreds of years of breeding for just the right fin design and betta tail style and coloration, the result is a long-finned fish that swims very little and very poorly due to its outrageously long fins. A by-product of selective breeding for certain non-critical characteristics is the fact that long-finned bettas are much more susceptible to betta diseases.

A stronger immune system, leading to less bacterial infections and disease, and greater ability to swim has caused the plakat betta to be a favorite among tropical fish owners. Everyone knows how prone to sickness the long-finned bettas are, and enjoy the relative ease of raising the hearty plakat betta.

The short-finned bettas are also much easier to breed. Since they are mouth brooders – the male keeps the fry in his mouth until they are strong enough to swim on their own – they generally have a better chance of survival than the bubble nest bettas that can be snatched up by any passing fish as they sit in their bubble nest near the surface of the water.

Since a betta tail must be powerful to help the fish maneuver in a betta fight, the shorter finned varieties are much more in demand where enthusiasts actually fight bettas and bet on the outcome. This is a huge “sport” in Thailand and Viet Nam, and is where the term Siamese Fighting Fish comes from.

The plakat betta can be found in any number of color combinations, so they are every bit as beautiful and splendid as their over-bred family members. If you are looking for a fish that is more resistant to the many betta diseases, is easier to care for, easier to breed and has a longer lifespan, consider the beautiful plakat betta with the shorter fins and betta tail as your next pet.

P.S.
Hi guys,
Elizabeth here.
I just wanted to say thank you for reading, and let you in on a special offer that a friend of mine has made available to the readers of my blog.

Adam Short has been raising Betta Fish for over 25 years, and has compiled all his extensive knowledge into the most comprehensive, no “B. S.” (baloney sandwich) betta care guide I have found. I have personally been raising bettas for 20 years, and was amazed at the amount of information in this e-Book that I would never have known, like how to get bettas to live up to 5 years!

For a limited time, if you use this special link …
http://www.GodzillaFish.info
you will receive this amazing Betta Care Guide
at a special price, and
4 FREE bonuses.

Here’s what you get –

1 – Betta Care Guide – regular price $19.77
Already over 970 happy customers. Covers tank prep, purchasing supplies, choosing bettas, maintenance, upkeep and treating disease. Most exhaustive betta care guide I have found. (I personally value this guide at over $100, it is that good.)

2 – Medicine Checklist – regular price $4.95
A list of products to keep in your Betta medicine chest. A must have.

3 – Online Shopping Checklist – regular price $4.95
A list of the best places to shop online for Betta supplies.

4 – Aquarium Checklist – regular price $4.95
A complete list of all of the items you need to start and run your Betta aquarium the right way.

5 – Specific Recommendations and Reviews – regular price $4.95

This is a $39.57 value … and you can get it today for only $14.77.
That’s about the cost of two betta fish (or one nice one!).

Adam is allowing this special offer to go to only the
NEXT 50 36 betta lovers who use this special link … http://www.GodzillaFish.info

This offer will not last long, so click the link and download now.

This is the same course I refer to every day, and I know it can help enrich your life and the lives of your beautiful bettas.

Elizabeth

P.S.
When you get the course, let me know
what you think and I will post
your input here!

ElizabethChristopher@BettaFacts.info


Betta Fins – Will Damaged Fins Grow Back?

April 12, 2010

Betta Fins – Will Damaged Fins Grow Back?
By Elizabeth Christopher

Many fish owners have other fish in the tank with their bettas. Either through contact with other aggressive fish, other bettas or betta diseases, they may notice the betta fins become torn, ripped or jagged. A common question after noticing this condition is whether the fins will regenerate. The answer lies in how the fish lost part of its fins.

Fin rot can cause betta fins to appear jagged, or incomplete. This is because the tank conditions have deteriorated in your tank, parasites and bacteria have attacked your betta, and begun to eat the betta fins or tail. This disease is very easy to treat, and virtually never leads to other afflictions. Betta fin rot is virtually non-existent in a clean, well- maintained tank that has approximately one tablespoon per five gallons of aquarium salt added.

Your fish’s fins will immediately start to regenerate and fill in the jagged, torn spots almost immediately after the tank conditions improve. It is then a mere case of ongoing tank maintenance.

Betta fins can, however, also become damaged due to fighting other fish. When this occurs, the damage can be extensive. If not caught soon enough, the fighting can lead to severe damage that goes all the way to the body of the fish. Separation and treatment in a salt bath to protect against bacterial infection must be immediate.

In some severe cases, both disease and fighting can lead to permanent damage of the fins or tail, but in almost all cases, if the fish is treated properly, and eased back into a clean, well-maintained tank, fin and tail re-growth is guaranteed. Knowing the precise treatment of disease, and some trade secrets about tank maintenance, will allow you to effectively extend your betta lifespan to three to five years.

“Want to know all about Betta Fins, and total betta set-up and care? I have enjoyed raising healthy, happy bettas for over 20 years, and use only one betta care guide, Adam Short’s Betta Care Made Easy.
Elizabeth Christopher

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Elizabeth_Christopher


Cycling Aquarium Water – Keeping Betta Diseases at Bay By Elizabeth Christopher

April 10, 2010

Cycling Aquarium Water – Keeping Betta Diseases at Bay
By Elizabeth Christopher

Cycling aquarium water is the easiest and most effective way to keep betta diseases at bay. Often called the nitrification process, the tank set-up process, or water change process, cycling aquarium water refers to the process of building up good bacteria in your tank water, substrate and filter. This good bacteria then turns harmful ammonia into beneficial nitrates for your fish.

The vast majority of ammonia in your tank comes from the waste of your fish. If the right types of bacteria are not established when cycling aquarium water, these higher levels of waste and ammonia deteriorate the water quality, causing bad bacteria to weaken your fish, leaving them susceptible to many betta diseases.

Cycling aquarium water is a process that takes two to eight weeks, and should be attempted BEFORE you add your fish. It involves some simple steps, and a few necessary items.

1 – Test, Test, Test!

You need an aquarium test kit that checks for ammonia, nitrites, nitrates and pH. Test the water at the same time of day for several days and write down your readings. The test kit will have instructions as to how to use it. Betta diseases are very easy to avoid, and testing your fish’s water condition is a major first step when cycling aquarium water.

2 – Add Nitrogen – Really!

Nitrogen is bad for your fish at high levels, but is necessary to cycle your tank. Add fish food to your fishless tank twice a day just as you would if you had fish. You can alternately drop a piece of fish one inch by two inches in instead. A commercial way to do this is to purchase liquid ammonia and add 5 drops per ten gallons of water. Add three drops per ten gallons of water daily after.

3 – Continue Testing – Where are the Nitrites?

After you notice ammonia present in your water, you will begin to get nitrite readings. This is just what you need to wipe out any betta diseases caused by bad bacteria. Soon after the intial nitrite readings, you will get nitrates showing up. At this stage, you need to do a 30% water change in your tank, and you are ready to add your fish.

Cycling aquarium water properly is a must if you are going to raise healthy, long-lasting bettas. By eradicating betta diseases before they get a foothold in your tank, you can extend your betta’s lifespan to three to five years. Always consult a comprehensive betta care guide when cycling your tank.

Hi guys,

Elizabeth here.

I just wanted to say thank you for reading, and let you in on a special offer that a friend of mine has made available to the readers of my blog.

Adam Short has been raising Betta Fish for over 25 years, and has compiled all his extensive knowledge into the most comprehensive, no “B. S.” (baloney sandwich) betta care guide I have found. I have personally been raising bettas for 20 years, and was amazed at the amount of information in this e-Book that I would never have known, like how to get bettas to live up to 5 years!

For a limited time, if you use this special link …
http://www.GodzillaFish.info
you will receive this amazing Betta Care Guide
at a special price, and
4 FREE bonuses.

Here’s what you get –

1 – Betta Care Guide – regular price $19.77
Already over 970 happy customers. Covers tank prep, purchasing supplies, choosing bettas, maintenance, upkeep and treating disease. Most exhaustive betta care guide I have found. (I personally value this guide at over $100, it is that good.)

2 – Medicine Checklist – regular price $4.95
A list of products to keep in your Betta medicine chest. A must have.

3 – Online Shopping Checklist – regular price $4.95
A list of the best places to shop online for Betta supplies.

4 – Aquarium Checklist – regular price $4.95
A complete list of all of the items you need to start and run your Betta aquarium the right way.

5 – Specific Recommendations and Reviews – regular price $4.95

This is a $39.57 value … and you can get it today for only $14.77.
That’s about the cost of two betta fish (or one nice one!).

Adam is allowing this special offer to go to only the
NEXT 50 36 betta lovers who use this special link … http://www.GodzillaFish.info

This offer will not last long, so click the link and download now.

This is the same course I refer to every day, and I know it can help enrich your life and the lives of your beautiful bettas.

Elizabeth

P.S.
When you get the course, let me know
what you think and I will post
your input here!

ElizabethChristopher@BettaFacts.info


Betta Diseases – Fin Rot

April 8, 2010

Betta Diseases – Fin Rot
By Elizabeth Christopher

Betta Fin Rot, also called Tail Rot, is a much too common ailment bettas suffer from when you consider that it is 100% preventable. Like almost all other betta diseases, it is usually brought about by poor aquarium water conditions. The inferior tank conditions then lead to an uptick in the bacterial level in the tank, and these bacteria attack the betta fins and tail, giving them a ragged appearance. Excessive, untreated betta fin rot can lead to extreme fin and tail destruction, affecting the way your fish moves about the tank. Left unchecked, it can lead to the contraction of Cotton Wool disease, one of the much more serious betta diseases.

The good news is betta fin rot, when treated properly, is easily combated, and your vibrant betta returns rapidly to its previous splendor. Remove all fish from the tank, whether you see fin rot on them or not. Separate the apparently diseased bettas form other non-infected fish. This is a very contagious disease, and all fish must be treated at the same time. Wash all gravel, rocks and tank toys in warm non-soapy water. Clean out the tank itself vigorously, and add tertracycline per manufacturer’s instructions to both the infected and apparently uninfected fish.

Once you have a clean tank with all gravel, plants, etc. ready to go, add the uninfected fish after monitoring to ensure they truly are clean. When your infected betta begins to heal, add him also. The important thing to take from your run-in with one of the most common betta diseases is proper tank maintenance. There is virtually no chance of betta fin rot in a healthy tank. That is how easy it is to kill this harmful bacteria. Clean your tank every two weeks or so, and it can be prevented.

Betta diseases are generally caused by poor tank conditions, which create a perfect breeding ground for bacteria. The fish then become stressed due to their poor living conditions, just as humans do, and their immune system begins to weaken. The strengthened bacteria then attack the weakened fish, causing any number of symptoms. The key here is, keep the water level the correct temperature, with the correct salt balance (yes, salt is needed in a freshwater tank), and your fish will thrive, and live long, healthy lives.

“Want to know all about Betta Fin Rot, and total betta set-up and care? I have enjoyed raising healthy, happy bettas for over 20 years, and I have found what I believe to be the single best, most complete betta resource you need, for veterans or beginners alike. Check out http://www.GodzillaFish.info for the same betta guide I use every day.”
Elizabeth Christopher


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